Issue Series 1 Extended Producers Responsibility and Inclusion: Brazil’s Extended Producer Responsibility and its Interface with Waste Pickers

Sonia Dias* The recycling industry since its early beginning had always relied on the work carried out by informal recycling workers in Brazil, the “catadores de materiais recicláveis” (pickers of recyclables). As household waste collection falls under the responsibility of municipalities the informal sector in Brazil works primarily reclaiming recyclables either as autonomous workers or … Continue reading Issue Series 1 Extended Producers Responsibility and Inclusion: Brazil’s Extended Producer Responsibility and its Interface with Waste Pickers

When the Minister read postcards written by waste pickers’ children

Aditya Vyas & Shrenik Mutha Waste pickers and other informal sector waste workers make a living collecting, sorting, recycling, and selling materials that others throw away. They contribute to local economies, public health and environmental sustainability. The vast majority of waste pickers in India are women, and Dalits, who have been invisible to society, faced … Continue reading When the Minister read postcards written by waste pickers’ children

Issue Series #1: Seven Reasons Why Decentralized Waste Management is Best for Emerging Economies

Andrew Almack* A Culture of Circularity  India is extremely blessed to have a functioning network of informal waste collectors, kabadiwalas and aggregators that work cohesively despite how decentralised their network is. Having tried and tested their methods for decades, the circular economy has been embedded in the culture and the resourcefulness of these players – … Continue reading Issue Series #1: Seven Reasons Why Decentralized Waste Management is Best for Emerging Economies

Issue Series #1: Reflections on EPR-based Systems Targeting Multi-Layered Plastics

Extended Producer Responsibility-based interventions can be designed to address these challenges in a way that strengthens the existing informal waste sector. EPR legislation for highly recyclable plastics like PET, HDPE, PP and LDPE, which are handled effectively by the informal sector, should be limited to strengthening this sector to maintain and report data on waste handled. Setting up centralized, private collection streams for these materials may be simpler for corporates, but will destroy the livelihoods of all the waste pickers and informal recycling sector actors who will be unable to survive without these viable materials.  Continue reading Issue Series #1: Reflections on EPR-based Systems Targeting Multi-Layered Plastics